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The Sixth Day by Trevor Rabin

 

The Sixth Day (Soundtrack) by Trevor Rabin

The Sixth Day
7/10

Buy The 3 Worlds of Gulliver (Soundtrack) by Bernard Herrmann from Amazon.com

 

 

Category

Score

Originality 8
Music Selection 8
Composition 7
CD Length 7
Track Order 7
Performance 7
Final Score 7/10

 

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Composer 
Trevor Rabin

 

Quick Quotes

"Trevor Rabin has hardly established himself as one of my favourite film composers with his works so far (though he has clearly established himself as one of Hollywood's favourite composers, which some would argue is more important) - his loud, overbearing scores seem to fill little musical or dramatic purpose and are just there for the sake of having some loud music in the film. With The 6th Day he overcomes one of these problems - by writing quite an entertaining album's worth of music - but not the other - I still don't see how the music serves even a vague dramatic purpose."  ***

James Southall - 
Movie Wave Reviews 
The 6th Day

 

 

Composed by Trevor Rabin
Produced by Trevor Rabin, Paul Lindford, Steve Kempster
Executive Producer: Robert Townson
Released by Varese Sarabande Records December 2000

Rabin's Day
Review by Christopher Coleman

Trevor Rabin’s third submission for 2000 is somewhat of a surprise.  While maligned or minimized by many film music fans, Rabin refuses to deliver the sort of cookie-cutter score found all too often in today's films.  Granted, this style is appealing to a distinct group of people, Rabin's music generally stands out from the pack.  While dependent upon synthesizers, Rabin is able to keep his music several levels above the ever-thinning sound of television sci-fi music. Rabin's scores may depart from the tried-and-true, and some would interject, “more acceptable” style of film music, but, more often than not, his work provides a few truly enjoyable themes.  Such is the case with The  6th Day.  

Following the inspirational Remember the Titans and his rubber-burning, techno-score for the Bruckheimer film, Gone in 60 Seconds, composer Trevor Rabin enters the sci-fi realm once again with The  6th Day.  For Mr. Schwartzenaggar’s simultaneous return to the sci-fi/action genre, Rabin delivers an eclectic score, that dawns a number of familiar Rabin-elements but also shows off an exotic touch.

On the familiar end, The  6th Day is constructed much like some of Rabin’s most popular scores such as Armaggedon.  This score, like Armageddon, is heavily dependent on its electronic components and most have come to expect this style from Trevor Rabin.   For the action/suspense sequences of The  6th Day, Rabin uses deep and ominous synths, choral accents, and bombastic crashes that also show up quite frequently in his work.  In addition, Rabin layers a lonely solo piano into his work for The  6th Day, as he has in scores such as Enemy of the State and Deep Blue Sea.

On the softer side, Rabin composes another enjoyable, emotional theme, much in line with the Launch cue from Armaggedon.  In fact, there is a two minute segment of track 4, Adam’s Theme, constructed almost identically to the aforementioned Armaggedon cue.  In any event, despite such similarities, The 6th Day is most appealing in these moments.

While there exist a number of similarities to many of Rabin’s earlier works, there are a few elements that help set this score apart from its 2000 predecessors. Rabin travels a much different road from both Remember the Titans and Gone in 60 Seconds.  Most noteworthy among them are the engaging Middle-Eastern vocals that are found in its title theme:  The 6th Day (1),  Drucker meets Drucker (12), Adams Goes Home (13). 

The 6th Day continues the love-hate responses from within the soundtrack-appreciation world.  It represents Rabin’s most impressive effort since Armaggedon and certainly is reminiscent of the 1998 hit.  I would recommend this effort to those who enjoyed Armageddon, even though The 6th Day is far less patriotic or inspirational.  On the other hand, if Armaggedon found itself on your “most-despised” list, then The 6th Day will likely do the same. 


Track Listing and Ratings

 Track Title Time

Rating

1 The 6th Day 4:04  ****
2 In the Beginning 2:02  ***
3 Cloning 2:22  ***
4 Adam's Theme 3:31  *****
5 One For the Team 2:22  ****
6 The Rescue 3:47  ***
7 Playing God 3:33  ***
8 The Roof Top 4:47  ***
9 Adam's Birthday 1:15  ***
10 Kill the Doctor 1:56  ***
11 The Hospital  1:39  ***
12 Drucker Meets Drucker 3:30  ***
13 Adam Goes Home 2:39  ****
14 The Kiss 1:14  ****
 

Total Running Time

56:22  
 

 Referenced Reviews
Armageddon | Deep Blue Sea | Enemy of the State

 

 

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