Buy The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian (Soundtrack) by Harry Gregson-Williams at Amazon.com

 

 

Soundtrack Blog Soundtrack Reviews Soundtrack Features Soundtrack Forum Soundtrack Contest Soundtrack Shop About and Contact Home Listen or subscribe to our podcast - The SoundCast Follow us on Twitter Like us at Facebook Tracksounds:  The Film Music and Soundtrack Experience

QUICK-CLICK REVIEWS (Vol. 25)

Apocalypse World War II
The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel
Music from the Batman Trilogy
The Possession

FULL  SOUNDTRACK REVIEWS

Captain America:  The Winter Soldier
Rio 2
Castlevania: Lords of Shadow 2
Castlevania: Lords/Shadow/Mirror of Fate
Doctor Who: Series 7

POPULAR FEATURES

Interview: Neil S. Bulk
A Composer's Guide to Video Game Music
Interview: Sean Callery
Interview: Trevor Morris
Music of Shadow (Castlevania)

LATEST PODCAST EPISODES

SoundCast 73 - The Winter Soldier
SoundCast 72 - 2013 Cue Awards
Soundcast 70 - The Desolation of Smaug
Interview: Brian Tyler (Thor/Dark World)
Soundcast 69 - The Music of Sound

 

 

 

The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian
by Harry Gregson-Williams

The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian

Buy online

 The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian (Soundtrack) by Harry Gregson-Williams
The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian (Download MP3 Soundtrack) by Harry Gregson-Williams
The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian (DVD)
The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian (3-Disc DVD)
The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian (Blu Ray)
The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian (3-Disc Blu Ray)
The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian (Poster and Memorabilia)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian (Soundtrack) by Harry Gregson-Williams

The Chronicles of Narnia:
Prince Caspian
Composed by Harry Gregson-Williams
Walt Disney Records (2008)

Rating: 8/10

Buy The Chronicles of Narnia:  Prince Caspian (soundtrack) by Harry Gregson-Williams from Amazon.com

 

Listen to this soundclip of The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince CaspianKings and Queens of Old (358 kb)

Listen to this soundclip of The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince CaspianSorcery and Sudden Vengeance
(360 kb)

Listen to this soundclip of The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian

Return of the Lion (351 kb)

More clips from The Chronicles of Narnia: Prince Caspian at Amazon.com

 

“THE CHRONICLES OF NARNIA: PRINCE CASPIAN is a score that has, like the Pevensie's, grown up a bit. While there remains an underlying sense of wonder, the music this time out is much more aggressive...and more engaging. ”

Nothing Happens the Same Way Twice
Review by Christopher Coleman

Composer Harry Gregson-Williams

"I think if Andrew Adamson was directing the next movie and I hadn't been asked to do it, then I don't think I could help myself from feeling extremely disappointed."

Harry Gregson-Williams


Read the full interview with Harry Gregson-Williams

In 2005, with the film and film-music world still slightly abuzz over director Peter Jackson and composer Howard Shore's masterwork for the LORD OF THE RINGS trilogy, came THE LION, THE WITCH, AND THE WARDROBE.  Between Jackson's epic trilogy and the HARRY POTTER franchise, the fantasy-genre was big-bucks again.  However, with the well documented friendship between authors, J.R.R. Tolkien and C.S. Lewis, specific comparisons between the two author's eventual film-adaptations were inevitable. Director Andrew Adamson's vision of C.S. Lewis' story was as different from Jackson's work as Tolkien's tale is from Lewis'. One of the key differences was reflected in the film's score by composer HARRY GREGSON-WILLIAMS. The unexpected modern-edge for THE LION, THE WITCH, AND THE WARDROBE, especially in light of Shore's more operatic work, perhaps brought undue criticism from the soundtrack community upon the score (myself included). In the years since; however, as the Lord the Rings energies have simmered down, the first film from the land of Narnia, as well as it's score has become, for some, appreciated on its own merits rather than merely as a contrast to Howard Shore's work... again, myself included. 

Three years later, we finally have the second installment from THE CHRONICLES OF NARNIA - PRINCE CASPIAN. Returning for the sequel is director Adamson, the four main "child-stars," and composer HARRY GREGSON-WILLIAMS. In THE LION, THE WITCH, AND THE WARDROBE, we clearly heard Gregson-Williams establish a distinct style for the Narnia franchise - an intriguing, albeit surprising, mix of classical and contemporary styles and instrumentation. It was certainly a bold move back in 2005 given the success of the Lord of the Rings and the Harry Potter franchises, which were both complete with more traditional, symphonic scores. The 2005 film was slower than some anticipated, especially at it's onset, hence the score was considered to lack a little intensity as well. Still, well established were themes and motifs representing the world of Narnia, the Pevensie children, and Aslan. Having done this, Harry Gregson-Williams, like the four youngsters who have returned to Narnia, is able to more fully explore his musical-landscape. In the end, PRINCE CASPIAN delivers a richer listening experience.

Following the characteristics of the new film, HARRY GREGSON-WILLIAMS' score features a darker, more intense, and more fully developed personality... as well a greater number of action/suspense pieces. With the Pevensie's return to Narnia, some 1300 years later, they find the land is quite a different place than the paradisiacal kingdom they inadvertently abandoned. Since that time, another race of man, called Telmarines, has taken power (apparently Spanish conquistadors found their way to Narnia and made it their business to exterminate all of the beings and races there.) With the good Prince Caspian on the run from his evil uncle and momentary king, Miraz, the four kings and queens of old being transported back to Narnia, the platter for a different movie experience is served.

Harry Gregson-Williams makes significant use of his original themes throughout. Very early on, he musically connects the the two films by following a subtle, french horn statement of Prince Caspian's theme with, first the Narnia theme, and then the Pevensie theme in "The Kings and Queens of Old" (2). He goes on to deliver a number of permutations of the Pevensie theme in "Arrival at the How" (4), "Raid on the Castle" (5) and the finale "The Door in the Air" (12). The Narnia motif, which help establish the overall tone of "wonder" in the previous film, does show up a number of times as well. In "The Kings and Queens of Old (2), we hear an expansive quotation, but is also occasionally employed in intriguing fashion in action sequences like "Raid on the Castle" (5) and "The Duel" (8). Outdoing even the Prince Caspian's theme, the composer makes the most use of Aslan's triumphantly strong motif. It is found in one form or another in just about every track that isn't directly representing one of the evil-doers of the film. It, too, makes strong appearances in each of the action sequences, but there are a few other noteworthy inclusions as well. We hear it played exotically on the electric-violin in "Journey to the How" (3), most majestically in "Arrival at Aslan's How" (4), and the most powerful performance of the theme in either film can be found in "Return of the Lion" (11).

A favorite moment comes in "The Door in the Air" (12) where HARRY GREGSON-WILLIAMS again teases portions of Imogen Heap's "Can't Take it In," which, itself remains one of the best pop-track inclusions on a score album to date. Also of note is "Sorcery and Sudden Vengeance" (7), which may be the darkest piece of either film. In it, we here similar, gutteral vocals (a la Buddhist chant) as we did in "The Stone Table" from the last film, before it erupts into the White-witch-battle-theme also established The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe.  While the detail of this scene was not included in the book, it's both visually and musically invigorating.  Further, the throne-ursurping Miraz is provided his own 8-note theme first heard "Raid on the Castle", but most clearly in "Miraz Crowned" (6).  Of course, the most significant thematic addition is that of Prince Caspian.  Rather than rival the heroic nobility of Aslan, the young prince's musical moniker is inherently more uncertain.  By the conclusion of the score, however; Gregson-Williams is able to convey the growing boldness and strength of the young prince.

A sad note on this release is that the three included pop-tracks don't come near to those from the previous soundtrack. "Can't Take it In" and "Wunderkind" from The Lion, The Witch, and The Wardrobe, went on to be well-recognized and huge hits in their own rights, but I'm not so sure any of these will do likewise.  Apparently, Imogen Heap did again submit a song for soundtrack, but it was rejected because it was said to be "too dark."  In regards to these pop-tracks, the overall rating of this soundtrack suffers only marginally, as the producers have wisely relegated them to the end.  Your propensity to enjoy this score is going to be directly connected to your reaction to first film's score. PRINCE CASPIAN is, on some level, more of the same. If the electronic elements didn't work for you in THE LION, THE WITCH, AND THE WARDROBE, then they likely won't work for you here. However, if you have come to appreciate HARRY GREGSON-WILLIAMS unique and surprisingly detailed approach to this fantasy film, as I eventually have come to, then you'll likely find this score even more enjoyable than the first. THE CHRONICLES OF NARNIA: PRINCE CASPIAN is a score that has, like the Pevensie's, grown up a bit. While there remains an underlying sense of wonder, the music this time out is much more aggressive...and more engaging. Prince Caspian is, without question, similar to its predecessor, but it is far from being the same thing twice.
 

Rating: 8/10

Got a comment?  Discuss this music here!


Track

Track Title Track Time  Rating
1 Prince Caspian Flees 4:33  ****
2 The Kings and Queens of Old 3:26  ****
3 Journey to the How 4:39  ****
4 Arrival at Aslan's How 2:53  ****
5 Raid on the Castle 7:00  *****
6 Miraz Crowned 4:42  ****
7 Sorcery and Sudden Vengeance 6:15  ****
8 The Duel 5:51  ****
9 The Armies Assemble 2:17  ****
10 Battle at Aslan's How 5:14  ****
11 Return of the Lion 4:10  *****
12 The Door in the Air 7:50  *****
13 The Call (Regina Spektor) 3:07  ***
14 A Dance "Round the Memory Tree" (Oren Lavie) 3:38  **
15 This is Home (Switchfoot) 3:58  ***
16 Lucy (Hanne Hukkleberg) 4:31  **
  Total Running Time (approx) 75 minutes  

 

 
   

 

Home  |  Soundtrack ReviewsBlog |  Podcast | News Forum  |  Features  |  About  |  Advertise  |  Links   | Shop  

YesAsia.com - Asian Entertainment products CD Universe - Music, Movies, & Games At Low Prices! iTunes Logo 88x31-1

Copyright ©1998 - 2009. Tracksounds:  The Film Music Experience.   All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed in any form.  All compact disc artwork is property of the specified record label and appears here for informational purposes only.  All sound clips are in Real Audio format or mp3 and are the exclusive property of their respective record labels. Contact the Webmaster