The Patriot (soundtrack) by Kyle Eastwood & Michael Stevens

 

 

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The Patriot by John Williams

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Patriot (Soundtrack) by John Williams

The Patriot
Composed by John Williams
Milan Records

Rating: 8/10

Buy The Patriot by John Williams  from Amazon.com




More clips from The Patriot at Amazon.com

 

Soundtrack Review

Williams has now memorialized the American Revolution as he has with World War II.

Early Olympic Arrival
Review by Christopher Coleman


The Nineties' John Williams was one best described as "memorial" in feeling, with a rare nod to his memorable styles of the seventies and eighties. The shift, or "maturing" as some would call it, in his style can easily be traced back to scores such as: JFK, Born on the Fourth of July, Schindler's List, Nixon, and confirmed later by scores such as Amistad and Angela's Ashes. The culmination of this trend is, of course, manifested in the ultimate memorial score, Saving Private Ryan. The announcement of John Williams replacing David Arnold as composer for The Patriot, launched a new anticipation in what Williams had in store for film music fans. Would he return to his former glory or stay fast on his nineties-heading?

John Williams has always been able to stir up the emotions of challenge, struggle, of loss, of triumph with a seeming particular ease. This sort of handiwork has been well demonstrated in his compositions for the 1984 and 1996 Olympic themes. With the onset of the 2000 Summer Olympics in Sidney, Australia on the world's doorstep, John Williams helps to get everyone in the mood with his work for this Summer Big-Ticket film. 

Initially, The main title (1, 17) reflects the simple joys of the New World, its ideals, and its physical beauty before moving into true patriotic/ Olympic fashion with snare drums and flutes. The theme is nearly as uplifting, inspiring and memorable as his earlier Olympic efforts and a certain delight of the Summer of 2000.
With The Phantom Menace score, many were left, at least, questioning whether the last of great Williams themes had been heard in decades passed. In The Patriot, film music fans will actually find most every action cue bearing resemblance to Williams work for the score for Episode one. Similarly, others wondered what Saving Private Ryan would have sounded like had Williams been assigned to score its bloody battle scenes. Now, the curious fan may have a glimpse as to what such cues might have sounded like.  

Throughout this CD, Williams holds one's attention with an adequate amount of variety. From the inspiring main theme, to the joyful romp of To Charleston (3), to the intensity and grandeur of Preparing for Battle (7), to the tragedy of The Parish Aflame (13), Williams intensifies the emotion of each respective scene while and, on the CD, captivates and sometimes catapults the listener from track to track. Even with the main-title-sandwich approach taken again (a la Saving Private Ryan) by the disc's producer, John Williams, the CD flows in a richly entertaining way.

With a film containing such wide variety in emotional content, it is rather clear that, truly, John Williams has moved on in his composition style, but is still able to produce a classic piece. No, The Patriot isn't what Williams would have produced twenty years ago. Only for the briefest instances does one hear any of the classic Williams style that won over thousands of film music fans over the last three decades. Williams has now memorialized the American Revolution as he has with World War II. If fans of Williams were in limbo about whether Williams has really moved passed his catchy-up-front-thematic style of the Seventies and Eighties, The Patriot will remove most remaining doubt. The challenge lay at the feet of the fans to appreciate and embrace what John Williams has grown into.


Rating: 8/10

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Track Listing and Ratings

Track

Track Title Track Time  Rating
1 The Patriot 6:39  *****
2 The Family Farm 3:04  ***
3 To Charleston 2:14  ****
4 The Colonial Cause 3:15  ****
5 Redcoats at the Farm and the Death of Thomas 4:59  ***
6 Ann Recruits the Parishioners 3:08  ***
7 Preparing for Battle 5:49  ****
8 Ann and Gabriel 4:34  *****
9 The First Ambush and Remembering the Wilderness 3:59  ***
10 Tavington's Trap 4:09  ****
11 The Burning of the Plantation 4:55  ***
12 Facing the British Lines 3:04  ****
13 The Parish Church Aflame 3:03  ****
14 Susan Speaks 3:16  ****
15 Martin VS. Tavington 3:06  ****
16 Yorktown and the Return Home 5:19  ****
17 The Patriot (Reprise) 7:49  *****
  Total Running Time (approx) 57 minutes  

 

 
   

 

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